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Qumran at Seventy

Team members are delighted to share Dr Dennis Mizzi’s recent publication, “Qumran at Seventy,” which appeared in Strata: The Bulletin of the Anglo-Israel Archaeological Association (2017): 9-45. Many thanks to Dr David Milson, and the society’s editorial committee, for allowing the network to reproduce this article here: Mizzi_Qumran@70

 

 

Marcello Fidanzio, ‘What Can We Learn from the Archaeology of Qumran Cave 11Q?’

Life at the Dead Sea

International conference at State Museum of Archaeology Chemnitz.

The Dead Sea is not only the lowest point of the earth but confronts humans with a harsh environment. And yet, over many thousands of years people made a living out of the region, built settlements, cities, temples and hid treasures in caves. This conference brings together researchers from different countries in order to discuss the region’s environment, its resources, cultural development and research on the Qumran site. Speakers  included Professor Marcello Fidanzio, presenting: “What Can We Learn from the Archaeology of Qumran
Cave 11Q?” 

 

 

Professor Marcello Fidanzio in Amman.

On 17 July 2017 Professor Marcello Fidanzio undertook a mission within the framework of The Qumran Caves Publication Project (Ecole biblique et archéologique française, Jerusalem [EBAF] and ISCAB-FTL; series editors J.-B. Humbert and M. Fidanzio) focusing on a large selection of (undisplayed) textiles in Amman, whose professional examination has been entrusted to Dr Mireille Bélis and Dr Christophe Moulherat.

Reporting from the Jordan Museum in Amman Professor Marcello Fidanzio, of the Istituto di Cultura e Archeologia delle terre Bibliche (ISCAB), and Research Associate at the École Biblique et Archeologique Française de Jérusalem, confirms that several types of material found in the Qumran caves are preserved in the Jordan Museum Amman. These include manuscripts from the caves 1Q and 4Q and the Copper Scroll from 3Q cave; pottery and a large amount of textiles, as was first observed by George Brooke over twenty years ago (Brooke 1996, 1997, 2000). These materials can now be understood in connection with the archival records related to the time of the excavation held by the Ecole biblique et archéologique française, Jerusalem (EBAF), and remain important assets in the care of the Jordanian authorities.

Further information regarding the manuscript collection at Amman has been published by George Brooke, from his study at the museum in 1996 as follows:
‘Amman Museum,’ in Encyclopaedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Oxford: OUP, 2000).
‘The Dead Sea Scrolls in the National Archaeological Museum, Amman,’ al-Nadwah (al-Bayt University Journal) 8 (1997), 23-35.
‘The Dead Sea Scrolls,’ Jordaniana (Summer, 1996), 16-17.

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Members of the First Scroll Team: From the Allegro Photographs at the Manchester Museum

Work on John Allegro’s extensive photographic records continues. During March these Manchester Museum pictures were scanned showing members of the first Scrolls team, led by Père Roland de Vaux from the École biblique et archéologique française de Jérusalem (ÉBAF).

  French scholar, Jean Starcky (1909-1988).

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Image B.ST.STARCKY.2 reproduced with permission of the Allegro Estate; courtesy of the Manchester Museum, the University of Manchester; for copyright and reproduction requests please contact collections@manchester.ac.uk

Father Pierre Benoit working on the Greek fragments from Murabba’at.

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Image B.ST.BENOIT.1 reproduced with permission of the Allegro Estate; courtesy of the Manchester Museum, the University of Manchester; for copyright and reproduction requests please contact collections@manchester.ac.uk

John Strugnell with fragments and tobacco pipe:

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B.ST.STRUGNELL.1 reproduced with permission of the Allegro Estate; courtesy of the Manchester Museum, the University of Manchester; for copyright and reproduction requests please contact collections@manchester.ac.uk

Featured image on this post:

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Father Józef Tadeusz Milik (1922-2006) handing a tray of fragments to John Allegro. Image B.ST.ALLEGRO.16; reproduced with permission of the Allegro Estate; courtesy of the Manchester Museum, the University of Manchester; for copyright and reproduction requests please contact collections@manchester.ac.uk

 

Copper Scroll Images from Allegro Archive

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Images reproduced by permission of the Allegro estate; courtesy of Manchester Museum, The University of Manchester. Please refer any image copyright and reproduction requests to collections@manchester.ac.uk

In addition to digitising the extensive collection of photographs taken by John Allegro, a number of images feature in Judith Brown’s biography of her father, John Marco Allegro: The Maverick of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Grand Rapids, Michigan and Cambridge: William B. Eerdmans, 2005), which have also been made available to the Network. This picture of Professor Wright Baker, from the former Manchester College of Technology (now UMIST), shows him here in profile working on the Copper Scroll,  complements the film footage which the project has digitised and made freely available on our recent post at https://dqcaas.com/2016/11/24/1953-film-of-cutting-open-of-the-copper-scroll

1955 Film of Cutting Open The Copper Scroll

Judy Brown, daughter of John Allegro, has generously supplied the Network with many materials related to her father, and we are moving forward with investigating them. Included in these materials was a mysterious roll of film in a metal spool, shot by John Allegro. In order to find out what it was, Joan Taylor visited film archive expert Tim Emblem-English at his London studio: http://www.theflyingspot.co.uk/. Tim was able to recognise that this film was developed as a ‘reversal’ straight out of the camera that shot it, and its Kodak serial number could be traced to 1953. That date turned out to fit perfectly with the contents, as it showed, amazingly, the Copper Scroll being cut into with a circular blade. Thanks to Professor H. Wright Baker, at the former Manchester Institute of Technology (now The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology), the scroll was first opened on 1 October 1955, and this film was shot on 3 October at the time of a second cut.  The film duration is only 1.21 seconds long, at 25 frames a second, but the quality (silver nitrate on celluloid) is excellent. We have digitised this footage and here make it available on this site for viewing. You may want to imagine the sound of an electric cutter as you watch it!

 

Kindly note that this film is copyright. For any use of this footage, please be in touch with the owner, Judy Brown at judybrown0@gmail.com. We thank her very much for allowing us to make use of this amazing piece of visual history and permitting us to digitise the footage.

 

 

Further details available in J.A. Brown,  “Opening the Copper Scroll,” in John Marco Allegro: The Maverick of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Grand Rapids, Michigan; Cambridge UK; Eerdmans, 2005), pp. 60-75.

Just Published by Marcello Fidanzio: The Caves of Qumran

 

The Caves of Qumran

Edited by Marcello Fidanzio, Facoltà di Teologia di Lugano

Continue reading “Just Published by Marcello Fidanzio: The Caves of Qumran”